Author: Aquaponics Association

Saturday

Putting Up Shoots

Sep 21 – 23, 2018 • Hartford, CT


Saturday Breakfast & Registration

Saturday, September 22 – 07:00AM to 08:00AM


Saturday Aquaponic Tour

Saturday, September 22 – 08:00AM to 12:00PM

Keney Park Sustainability Project and Trifecta Ecosystems


Saturday Lunch Panel Discussion: Growing Aquaponics Locally

Saturday, September 22 – 12:00PM to 01:00PM

Angela Tenbroeck,

Ken Armstrong,

Rob Torcellini,

Ryan Chatterson,

Spencer Curry,

Tawnya Sawyer

Rob Torcellini from Bigelow Brook Farm will moderate a session of expert, full-time aquaponic growers that are located throughout the country. Participating in the panel will be Ouroboros Farms, Chatterson Farms, Colorado Aquaponics/ Flourish Farm, and Bigelow Brook Farm. Bring your questions and glean knowledge from the industry experts!


AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group


Aquaponics in the Texas Prison System

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Micheal McLeon


Ask an Expert: Murray Hallam

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Murray Hallam


Optimizing Your Growing Environment

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Tawnya Sawyer

Success in aquaponics has a lot to do with the environment where your aquaponic system is located. What works outside in the tropics may not be functional in the Rocky Mountains and visa versa. There are a number of things that a grower can do to maximize their space to accomplish the greatest growing potential with the least amount of cost or other inputs. Planning a new site, or optimizing an existing space, learn the industry tips and tricks to get the most growth out of your aquaponic system.


Our Story – Specialty Produce Farm

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Helga Tan Fellows


Ryan Chatterson

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Ryan Chatterson

Session to be announced


The Next Generation Classroom Computer

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Kieran Foran

In the early 1980s, something amazing began to happen in classrooms across the globe – computers were introduced to facilitate computer-guided learning. This changed the landscape of education, as there never before was a tool that could cover such a broad range or be personalized to students of all needs and levels.

Today, we’re seeing a similar phenomenon. Classroom gardens, particularly aquaponics gardens, are the new and exciting tool that are sweeping schools throughout the nation, and for good reason! Using aquaponics as a classroom learning tool not only can aide in the teaching of engineering, math, science, and more, but can also make a huge, positive impact on students with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Join Kieran Foran, CMO and co-founder of Trifecta Ecosystems, as he explores aquaponics as a classroom learning tool, and reveals how his work in the field has left an imprint on students and educators throughout New England.


Use of Vermicompost as a Supplemental Nutrient Solution for Macrobrachium Rosenbergii and Basil Aquaponics System

Saturday, September 22 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Jose -Luis Izursa


AP Commercial Working Group

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

AP Commercial Working Group


AP Farm Design: Best Practices from Commercial Builders

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Angela Tenbroeck,

Arvind Venkat,

Ryan Chatterson


Aquaponics as a Community Builder

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Tawnya Sawyer


Ask an Expert: Angela Tenbroek

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Angela Tenbroeck


Business Model Innovations in Aquaponics

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM


Ken Armstrong

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Ken Armstrong

Session to be announced.


Simply Soil-Less: Where Elegance Unites Nature, Science & Technology

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Shari Rightmer

Simply Soil-Less Lifestyle makes it easy for everyone, especially to grow Aqua or Hydroponic anywhere including in your kitchen! Discover how easy it is. Snap ‘n Click, Plug ‘n Play! Its that simple. It can fit nicely in an apartment, patio, greenhouse, restaurant, cafe, STEM education, in/outdoors and portable. This is the never ending expanding world and lifestyle of Simply Soil-Less.


Why Aquaponics is the Best Hand-ons Model of our Planet for STEM Education

Saturday, September 22 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Djimo Serido

Session will focus on the effectiveness of aquaponics as a tool for STEM, specifically to deliver one of the fastest growing curriculum standards, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). I will speak about how STEM is growing traction but is lacking a framework and tools to make sense of technical skills as well as foster soft skills- and how aquaponics can fix that without disrupting the flow of the classroom. The session would also focus on the importance of aligning STEM with NextGen technology and industry such as the UN’s SDG. Finally, how aquaponics as a tool for education is incredibly versatile and offers unprecedented interdisciplinary exposure, all while encouraging environmental stewardship.


Saturday Afternoon Break

Saturday, September 22 – 02:50PM to 03:20PM


Against the Odds, Can Aquaponics Compete Commercially?

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Joel Kelly

Join us for a discussion about the potential for aquaponics farmers to compete in today’s hyper-competitive food industry. Do we now have the expertise, resources, and technology to create an entirely new, sustainably focused, healthy alternative to the big farms? What do we still need? How can a hobbyist turn their passion into a career opportunity? Find out here.


Angela Tenbroeck

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Angela Tenbroeck

Session to be announced.


AP Community Working Group

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

AP Community Working Group


Ask an Expert: Nick Savidov

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Nick Savidov, PhD


Oko Farm Skill Building Workshop

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Yemi Amu


Promoting Spinach Consumption and Sustainable Agricultural Practices in South Carolina Schools using Aquaponics

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Kimberly Baker

This session will discuss a project conducted by Clemson Cooperative Extension about promoting spinach consumption and sustainable agricultural practices in South Carolina schools using Aquaponics. The goals of this project were: 1) to increase nutritional knowledge and consumption of leafy green vegetables; 2) to enhance good handling practices and food safety during production and preparation; and 3) to promote South Carolina sustainable production practices, focusing on Aquaponics. Two classes from two high schools participated in the project in which the class teacher was taught how to run an aquaponics system; and teach the students pre-determined learning content. Lesson topics included: safe food handling, food safety of produce and nutrition and cooking of spinach. Students and teachers were given a pre-test and post-test in order to evaluate knowledge gained. This session will discuss how the project was implemented, project results and how this can be incorporated into other schools nationwide.


Visualizing with Sketchup

Saturday, September 22 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Peter Hill

Visualizing your new farm or expansion with Sketchup. The basics for quick layouts and how to use the Warehouse to multiply the power of other designs and ideas. Geo-locate to assess Solar performance (plants and power) and compare with GoogleEarth and PVWatts.


AP STEM Working Group

Saturday, September 22 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

AP STEM Working Group


Ask an Expert: Arvind Venkat

Saturday, September 22 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Arvind Venkat


Bridging Vision Into Reality: How To Apply Both To Your Aquaponics Venture, The Right Way

Saturday, September 22 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Spencer Curry

There’s a little secret about the commercial aquaponics industry that you may not know – it doesn’t really exist yet. However, there are many markets and consumer groups that you may have never thought of that need aquaponics right here, right now. Dive into the future of aquaponics with Spencer Curry, CEO and co-founder of Connecticut’s own Trifecta Ecosystems, and discover the difference between vision and reality, and how both can be used to benefit each other when growing in the commercial aquaponics industry.

We’ll explore the mission behind the City that Feeds Itself‚Ñ¢ and take an in-depth look into sectors that are spending on aquaponics right now – helping you to make a solid plan for your business while staying true to your vision. Don’t miss out on this session that will force you to think outside the farm!


Incorporating a Solar PVT/Water to Water Heat Pump and Thermal Storage for Aquaponic Farms

Saturday, September 22 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Erik Hawkins

Demonstrate the huge potential that solar PVT systems can provide the Aquaponics industry for a sustainable delivery of fish and food, both on grid and off grid


Urban Agriculture Design Concepts for Recirculating Aquaculture/Aquaponic Systems (RAS)

Saturday, September 22 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Michael Westphal

Local food production supports local economies. Market demand for locally grown fresh produce and sustainably sourced animal products have emerged, encouraging the development of innovative sustainable agriculture systems and the creation of regional food hub markets. This direct-to-consumer distribution network facilitates farm products to be transported over shorter geographic distances and promotes community support and engagement to hearten healthy diets and further society towards sustainable food production. Aquaponics is the environmentally sustainable food production method that combines aquaculture and hydroponics through the cultivation of fish and plants together in a recirculating ecosystem utilizing natural bacterial cycles to convert fish waste into plant nutrients. A range of recirculating aquaculture/aquaponic systems (RAS) have been engineered by the authors to support the local entrepreneur interested in urban agriculture. These design concepts include component sizing and selection, equipment cost estimates, and detailed construction drawings with system layout that are made available through RippleRootAquaponics.com.


Saturday Networking Mixer

Saturday, September 22 – 05:30PM to 06:30PM


Saturday Banquet Dinner

Saturday, September 22 – 06:30PM to 08:30PM


Sunday Breakfast

Sunday, September 23 – 07:00AM to 08:00AM


Aquaponic Association Business

Sunday, September 23 – 08:00AM to 11:00AM


Commercial AP Working Group: Conference Summary & Next Steps

Sunday, September 23 – 11:00AM to 11:30AM


STEM AP Working Group: Conference Summary & Next Steps

Sunday, September 23 – 11:30AM to 12:00PM


Sunday Lunch

Sunday, September 23 – 12:00PM to 01:00PM


AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group: Conference Summary & Next Steps

Sunday, September 23 – 01:00PM to 01:30PM


Community AP Working Group: Conference Summary & Next Steps

Sunday, September 23 – 01:30PM to 02:00PM


Next Steps and Closing Comments

Sunday, September 23 – 02:00PM to 02:30PM

Friday

Putting Up Shoots

Sep 21 – 23, 2018 • Hartford, CT


Friday Breakfast & Registration

Friday, September 21 – 07:00AM to 08:00AM

Friday Aquaponic Tours

Friday, September 21 – 08:00AM to 12:00PM

Bigelow Brook Farm and Uconn Spring Valley Student Farm Tour


Friday Panel Lunch Discussion: Growing Global

Friday, September 21 – 12:00PM to 01:00PM

Arvind Venkat,

Carlos Leon,

Murray Hallam

AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group


AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

AP Research, Applied Skills & Food Safety Working Group


Aquaponics and You

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Pavel Sfera

As an active charity worker, my travels have given me insights on how to improve the lives of the less fortunate and disadvantaged. The concerns of basic needs still arise for communities all over the world. I have engaged and lectured individuals, groups and other decision makers with resources the ideas of sustainability and a focus on aquaponics. I have spoken personally to the former President of the United Nations in creating a specific department specializing in aquaponics. I’ve sent letters to FEMA and have spoken with many of the NGOs with whom I’ve volunteered with in creating such systems to engage those communities into sustainability and healthier food choices.

My wishes are to have those involved involved in both commercial and who take aquaponics seriously, become more actively engaged in working with NGOs or starting their own to eliminate global hunger.


Aquaponics: A Dynamic Model for Inclusion of STEM Concepts into Middle & High School Science Classrooms

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Kevin Savage

Aquaponics, a bridge between the sustainable agriculture methods of aquaculture and hydroponics, provides a model for teaching STEM concepts in middle and high school classrooms, while also meeting the Next Generation Science Standards. This presentation will begin with an introduction into the design, construction and operation of various system types, and the STEM principles in each step. This discussion will contrast using an Engineering Design Model vs. Scientific method approach to classroom aquaponics. The second portion will detail how aquaponics may be used in curriculum integration to meet specific items of the Next Generation Science Standards for Middle and High School Physical and Life Sciences, using examples from Biology and Chemistry.


Ask an Expert: Ken Armstrong

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Ken Armstrong

Decoupled Aquaponics – An Alternative Approach for Commercial Production

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Hendrick Monsees

Aquaponics is a promising approach for a sustainable intensification of food production and the number of commercial systems is increasing in Europe, the US and worldwide. Nevertheless, balancing nutrient concentrations and establishing optimal growth conditions for fish and plants is challenging, especially with demanding crops (e.g. tomatoes). In classical aquaponic systems hydroponic units are integrated in the water cycle of an aquaculture system. This can result in suboptimal growth conditions (e.g. pH). Decoupled aquaponic systems were developed to address these obstacles by separating the two production cycles. Aquaculture and hydroponic units are connected via a one-way valve and water is only transferred from the aquaculture unit to hydroponic units on demand, but not back. Thereby an individual management of both production units and the maintenance of optimal growth conditions in decoupled aquaponics are enabled, resulting in comparable yields compared to conventional production systems.


Demonstration of a Small-scale Decoupled Aquaponic System Utilizing a Floating Bead Bioclarifier and Airlift Technology

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Paul Begue

At the AST greenhouse research facility (New Orleans, LA), a small-scale decoupled aquaponic systems was constructed and evaluated. The aquaponics system was de-coupled where a fish culture loop consisted of a single round 1 m3 polytank (~250 gal), a self-backwashing bio-clarifier, and a 0.12 m3 (34 gal) mineralizing tank. The plant culture loop consisted of a second 0.12 m3 (34 gal) sump tank, and 2 hydroponic raft culture raceways, each at 3 m2 (32 ft2). An economic analysis of fish and plant production in addition to water quality and feed conversion variables for the current status of the system will be presented.


Growth and Water Use in Aquaponics Culture of African Catfish, Tilapia and Selected Vegetable Crops at Varying Stocking Densities and Water Exchange Regimes in Nigeria

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Ayoola Akinwole

Reduced environmental pollution and water consumption has endeared aquaponics to small-holders in urban cities of Nigeria as a food production system that could serve their needs. Experiments spanning two years were conducted to empirically evaluate fish growth, crop performance and water utilization in aquaponics culture of fish and crops of commercial importance in Nigeria.


Murray Hallam

Friday, September 21 – 01:00PM to 01:50PM

Murray Hallam

Session to be announced


AP Commercial Working Group

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

AP Commercial Working Group


Aquaponics in Romania

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Cristan Bulbuc

The paper presents the aquaponics pilot stations that are in operation in Romania, aquaponics achievements and the aquaponics development strategy in Romania.


Arvind Venkat

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Arvind Venkat

Session to be announced


Ask an Expert: Ryan Chatterson

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Ryan Chatterson

Nutritional and Physiological Responses to High Carbohydrates in Common Carp

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Rabar Mahmod Rashed

The present study aims at testing the effect of high levels of local carbohydrate sources in the diet of common carp on the nutritional parameters such as growth, feed utilization, protein utilization, digestibility and feed evacuation. Physiological parameters such as hepato-somatic index, blood glucose and amylase activity were also studied. At the end of the experiments, the chemical composition of the whole body of fish was analysed and evaluate.
Young common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) ranging in weight from 25 g to 39 g were used as experimental fish. A total of 120 fish were used during the whole experiment.


The Introduction of Aquaponics Systems in the Educational Setting in Montgomery County, Virginia.

Friday, September 21 – 02:00PM to 02:50PM

Alexa Mione

The use of aquaponics in a middle school classroom broadcasts not only the workings of aquaculture and hydroponics, but of ancillary issues such as food security, water quality, and sustainability. Interactive lesson plans incorporate environmental education into their curriculum, expanding the aquaponics system to include ecological and societal systems. These supplemental topics expose children at an early age of critical issues that their generation will eventually need to manage.

A guided discussion will contribute to the knowledge of this interactive learning resource. The focus will be on using aquaponics not only as innovative agricultural technology, but to relate to and explain the ecological systems taught in environmental science curriculums. Children will better understand the natural sciences when they are taught alongside aquaponics.


Friday Afternoon Break

Friday, September 21 – 02:50PM to 03:20PM

AP Community Working Group

Friday, September 21 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

AP Community Working Group


Ask an Expert: Spencer Curry

Friday, September 21 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Spencer Curry

Development of Bio-Engineering for Commercial Aquaponics

Friday, September 21 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Carlos Leon

Carlos will discuss the commercial production of shrimp and algae in aquaponic systems; and the newest technologies that make this possible.


Nick Savidov, PhD

Friday, September 21 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Nick Savidov, PhD

Session to be announced.


The Use of Phytase in Aquaculture: Zootechnical Interests and the Possibilities of Incorporation in Aquafeed

Friday, September 21 – 03:20PM to 04:10PM

Niang Sileye

AP STEM Working Group

Friday, September 21 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

AP STEM Working Group


Ask an Expert: Carlos Leon

Friday, September 21 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Carlos Leon

Coupled Versus Decoupled Aquaponic Design: Panel Discussion

Friday, September 21 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Arvind Venkat,

Hendrick Monsees,

Murray Hallam,

Nick Savidov, PhD,

Ryan Chatterson

GLOBALG.A.P. Made Simple

Friday, September 21 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Juli Ogden

Seems like an improbable task, doesn’t it? But the best food safety programs are those that fit to your farming operation, rather than the other way around. Some of the food safety requirements you are being asked to comply with are already being done, you just don’t realize it. During this session, we’ll look at how to incorporate FOOD SAFETY and ORGANIC rules in your AQUAPONIC work day. Learn how by hearing from farmer innovator and GLOBALG.A.P expert, Juli Ogden.


Opportunities and Limitations in Sustaining Community-Driven Aquaponics Operations

Friday, September 21 – 04:20PM to 05:10PM

Christopher Williams

Aquaponics is a multidisciplinary practice with a variety of participants and consumers. As such, aquaponics communities operate on varying levels of knowledge, resources and target audiences, producing a wide range of operational strategies. In community-driven projects this gap is further extended, where maintaining outreach and sustained engagement may be strained. This stems from a myriad of sources, including poor business strategies, unrealistic expectations, ideological issues, limited resources and a limited pool of participants willing to pay premiums for aquaponics products. This presentation utilizes previous research alongside a comprehensive literature review of aquaponics operations to detail where the most feasible outlets lie in mitigating obstacles within community aquaponics operations. The results of this research demonstrate that operations suffer from sustaining wide enough consumer bases to compete with mainstream distributors, despite a perceived interest in aquaponics. Suggestions for improvements are presented in product selection, educating participants and increasing community input.


Friday Networking Mixer

Friday, September 21 – 05:30PM to 06:30PM

2019 Conference Call for Presentation Proposals

 

 

Putting Down Roots Conference Content

The Presenters:

2018 U.S. Farm Bill Campaign

Update: 2/1/2018

About every five years the Federal Government passes a massive, far-reaching “Farm Bill” with the main aim of providing an adequate national supply of food and nutrition. The Bill affects all facets of the U.S. food system including nutrition assistance, crop subsidies, crop insurance, research, and conservation. The 2014 Farm Bill directed the spending of about $450 billion.

The 2018 U.S. Farm Bill is on track to ignore aquaponics unless we make our voices heard! Here are some ways to get involved:

 

Here’s our 2018 Farm Bill Fact Sheet:

Here’s our 2018 Farm Bill Fact Sheet:

Introduction to the Members Area

Welcome to our Members site.  Once logged in, you will be directed to our Members-Area Page.  The Logged in bar should be showing at the top right corner as shown but this picture.

 

This is the main activity area for our community.  You can share most anything here much like a post to any social media platform.  From the menu in the top right corner you can customize your profile and change your username to anything that you would like.  This is important because you can tag anyone in a post by using there username.  For example, the user in the picture, username is “@aaron”.  You can find anyones username by visiting their profile.
Friend requests can be sent out to grow your connections. There is also a place for you to upload pictures and audio, join or create groups and co create documents  with one another.  Create and share  or join events.

 

Switch to Mobile App

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our mobile Web App is designed to help our members connect better on mobile devices.  Members please try both versions to find which environment you enjoy the most on your devices.  Cheers!

 

Organic Comment Fall 2017

Aquaponics and Hydroponics Organic Coalition Comment for the Fall 2017 NOSB Meeting

The Aquaponic and Hydroponic Organic Coalition recommends that the NOSB allow organic certification of aquaponic and hydroponic (AP/HP) farms that are compliant with USDA organic standards. These farming methods align with the organic

mission and the integrity of the organic label stands much to gain by including them.

AP/HP are critical to improving the sustainability of our agricultural system, but revoking organic eligibility would move these industries backwards at a time we must foster their growth.

AP/HP fit the Organic mission. The Organic label is about empowering consumers to identify products that match their values. Consumers do not prefer organic because it is grown in soil; they prefer it because it is pesticide-free, environmentally sustainable, and relies on natural ecosystems for plant growth. So the question is: do AP/HP align with what the consumer expects when they purchase organic? Yes.

“Organic” is perceived by consumers to mean:

-Production without synthetic chemicals. AP/HP do not require synthetic pesticides or fertilizers.

-Production that fosters the cycling of resources, ecological balance, and biodiversity conservation. AP/HP can be constructed as closed-loop ecosystems in which only the minimum required water and nutrients are added and with minimal or no discharge. AP/HP have also proven they can produce more food than soil culture per land area, thus saving more of the natural environment from the toll of agriculture.

-Production that relies on biological ecosystems to support plant health. Organic AP/HP production relies on a robust microflora in the root zone—made of the same types and numbers of bacteria and fungi that thrive in soil. This flora converts nutrients into forms available to plants and maintains plant health by reinforcing naturally-occurring mechanisms of disease resistance—just as in a healthy soil. (see attached Soil Food Web Report)

-Production that responds to site-specific conditions by integrating cultural, biological, and mechanical practices. Consumers expect that organic produce has been grown with a healthy human element, where local customs, expertise, and ingenuity can overcome droughts, concrete jungles, and climate changes. AP/HP allow environmentally-sensitive agriculture where growing in soil isn’t possible.

The benefits of AP/HP include: water savings, reduced nutrient use and fertilizer runoff, shorter supply chains, food safety, and space efficiency.

In an era of climate change, resource depletion, and rapid population growth, the organic price premium is a critical incentive to draw more entrants into this market. If the NOSB revokes AP/HP organic eligibility, these industries will not grow as quickly and our environment, health, and economy will suffer.

AP/HP align with the values of organic that consumers expect, and they are highly sustainable. Rather than placing a greater toll on our environment and health, the NOSB should retain the organic eligibility of aquaponics and hydroponics.

Thank you,
The Aquaponic and Hydroponic Organic Coalition

Members:
Agua Dulce Farm
Anacostia Aquaponics
Aquaberry Gardens
Arbordale Nurseries
Archi’s Institute
Association for Vertical Farming
Austin Aquaponics
Berry Audit Services
Blue Mojo Farm, LLC
Boto Waterworks
Cali Summer Clubs
CC Grow Inc.
CEA Fresh Farms
Center Valley Organics LLC
Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy
City of Minot North Dakota
NC Simple Life Farms LLC
Downtown Farms and Aquaponics
Edenworks
Evergreens
Fazenda Urbana Inc.
FloppyHatFarms
Fresh Farm Aquaponics, Inc
Freshies Aquaponics
Friendly Aquaponics, Inc
Gateshead Consulting Corporation
Great Lakes Growers LLC
HATponics
Heartland Aquaponics, LLC
Jenoe Group – Hydroponics
JoLi Farms
Joyful J Farms
Kabcao Aquaponics
Laughing Bear Enterprises
Living Justly Industries
Lotus Urban Farm and Garden Supply
Making Seeds 2 Cell
Manas Organic
Marine Science Faculty, Autonomous University of Sinaloa
Moroccan association of hydroponics
Northeast Brooklyn Housing Development Corporation
Oko Farms, LLC
Profound Microfarms
Rainsmith Agritech/Aquaponics
Renew Richmond
Re-Nuble
Solar Spice and Tea Trading Company
Springworks Farm
Symbiotic Aquaponic
Synergy Star Events
TerraFirma Aquaponixx
Texas Organic Matters
The Family Fish Farms Network, Inc
Trifecta Ecosystems, Inc
VERDEEN
Verticulture Farms
Windy City Harvest / Chicago Botanic Garden
Yep Yep Organic Farm

Individuals:
Amber C. Monroe
Andrew Carter
Everett L Melton
Imad Jabbour
Ivy Diene
Juan Pablo Pesalaccia
Krishnagopal Sharma
Marc L. Maynard
Matthew Henley
Peter Tyler
Xina Ash

Contact: brian.filipowich@gmail.com

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